Alert: An Update on COVID-19 from OrthoSport Victoria Read More

Alert:

An Update on COVID-19 from OrthoSport Victoria

As COVID-19 continues to spread in our community, OSV remains OPEN FOR BUSINESS, but we would like to advise our existing and new patients of the following guidelines when making or attending an appointment

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Preparing for your surgery

As an OSV patient we aim to provide quality Orthopaedic treatment and care to assist you to return to an active life. Please read carefully the information below to assist in the planning for your procedure.

Pre-admission

Pre-admission is an important part of your care. You will be advised by your OSV surgeon’s rooms at which hospital location your surgery will be performed and your preparation requirements. If you have any concerns that aren’t answered below or in our FAQs, please phone our main rooms on 03 9038 5200.

PRE-SURGERY

  • Your surgeon may send you for routine blood tests and any other investigations required prior to your surgery
  • If necessary, make arrangements for help around the house prior to surgery
  • Please advise your OSV surgeon of any medications or antibiotics that you are taking. This is important information for your treatment. You may be required to cease some of these prior to your surgery
  • Please ask your surgeon about ceasing blood thinning medication, eg aspirin, warfarin, Plavix, apixaban, prior to your surgery
  • Anti-inflammatory medications should be ceased 10 days prior to surgery as they can cause bleeding
  • Stop smoking as soon as possible prior to surgery
  • Follow your fasting instructions. This is generally nothing to eat for 6 hours prior to your surgery, and only drinking water up to 2 hours prior to your surgery, but check with your surgeon’s rooms

DAY OF YOUR SURGERY

  • You should generally take your normal morning medication on the day of your surgery with a small sip of water, unless advised otherwise
  • Please shower on the morning of your surgery
  • Wear loose, comfortable, clean clothing and flat shoes
  • Remove any jewellery and body piercings
  • DO NOT wear contact lenses. If you wear glasses, bring a case for them
  • Leave valuables at home
  • If you have them already, bring your crutches or any other mobility aids you use or will require post surgery
  • Report to the hospital main reception on the day and time that you have been advised
  • Further tests may be required on admission
  • You will meet the admitting staff who will fill out your paperwork for hospital records
  • You will meet your anaesthetist who will answer questions relating to your anaesthetic
  • You will be given hospital clothes to change into
  • The operation site will be shaved and cleaned
  • You will be transferred to the holding bay or preanaesthetic room before you go to the operating room

X-RAYS

Please bring all relevant X-rays and scans with you to hospital and remember to take them home again on discharge.

Fees

The following notes have been prepared to provide you with some additional information about expenses related to your forthcoming admission to hospital. Hopefully they will answer many of the questions that you may have.

With regard to out of pocket expenses, there are many factors that come into play. For those patients with private health insurance, there are differing levels of insurance fund arrangements with private hospitals. For those patients covered by a sports insurance policy, these policies also vary widely.

You will receive an informed financial consent form regarding out of pocket expenses for the surgeon’s fee when you make your booking for surgery. The surgical fee includes initial follow up visits. However, later consultations (generally those more than three months after surgery) usually attract a separate charge.

It is routine for the surgeon to use an assistant. They will usually introduce themselves to you prior to surgery. Assistants’ fees are calculated at a maximum of 20% of the surgeon’s fee.

Naturally, there is also a separate fee for the anaesthetist, for which there may be an out of pocket expense.

Health insurance funds only cover medical fees up to certain levels. Most fees charged will be above these levels so that an out of pocket expense can be anticipated by virtually all patients regardless of their insurance status.

Most sports insurance policies require you to pay your accounts first and then send the receipts to the insurance company for reimbursement. This usually means that you will be required to pay your hospital account on admission.

An estimate of the actual hospital expenses can be obtained prior to surgery by speaking to the admissions department of the admitting hospital and quoting a Commonwealth Medical Benefits Schedule (CMBS) item number as well as the expected length of admission. Both the anticipated item number and the length of stay can be obtained from your surgeon’s rooms.

However, please note that an estimate of the hospital expenses is just that and only includes the cost of the hospital bed and theatre fee. Other expenses may be incurred (see below) and the final CMBS item numbers may vary depending on the findings at surgery.

Admission Times & Fasting

This will be explained prior to your surgery and our rooms will contact you the day before your surgery to confirm admission and fasting times. Please note that fasting means nothing to eat or drink. For the safety of your anaesthetic you must observe the fasting time.

Health Funds & Expenses

The following notes have been prepared to provide you with some additional information about expenses related to your forthcoming admission to hospital. Hopefully they will answer many of the questions that you may have.

With regard to out of pocket expenses, there are many factors that come into play. For those patients with private health insurance, there are differing levels of insurance fund arrangements with private hospitals. For those patients covered by a sports insurance policy, these policies also vary widely.

You will receive an informed financial consent form regarding out of pocket expenses for the surgeon’s fee when you make your booking for surgery. The surgical fee includes initial follow up visits. However, later consultations (generally those more than three months after surgery) usually attract a separate charge.

It is routine for the surgeon to use an assistant. They will usually introduce themselves to you prior to surgery. Assistants’ fees are calculated at a maximum of 20% of the surgeon’s fee.

Naturally, there is also a separate fee for the anaesthetist, for which there may be an out of pocket expense.

Health insurance funds only cover medical fees up to certain levels. Most fees charged will be above these levels so that an out of pocket expense can be anticipated by virtually all patients regardless of their insurance status.

Most sports insurance policies require you to pay your accounts first and then send the receipts to the insurance company for reimbursement. This usually means that you will be required to pay your hospital account on admission.

An estimate of the actual hospital expenses can be obtained prior to surgery by speaking to the admissions department of the admitting hospital and quoting a Commonwealth Medical Benefits Schedule (CMBS) item number as well as the expected length of admission. Both the anticipated item number and the length of stay can be obtained from your surgeon’s rooms.

However, please note that an estimate of the hospital expenses is just that and only includes the cost of the hospital bed and theatre fee. Other expenses may be incurred (see below) and the final CMBS item numbers may vary depending on the findings at surgery.

Other Expenses

Other expenses that may be incurred include:

PHYSIOTHERAPY

Depending on your health insurance status, you may receive a separate account for physiotherapy.

RADIOLOGY

Many procedures involve having an X-ray taken during or following an operation. In such cases you may receive a separate account for radiology.

PHARMACY

Medications which are prescribed for you to take home on discharge will attract a separate fee.

PATHOLOGY

Should you require pathology investigations such as blood tests, you may receive a separate account for these.

IMPLANTS

Many operations involve the use of implants or fixation devices such as screws, plates or anchors. These are usually covered by private health insurance. However, self-insured patients and those patients covered by sports insurance can expect a separate account for these implants. The cost of these implants is often surprising.

PHYSICIAN

Depending on a number of factors including the type of procedure, your general health and your surgeon’s preferences, a physician may also be involved in your care. In these circumstances you would receive a separate account from the physician.

COMPLICATIONS

All surgery carries the risk of complications. Should complications occur, it may require readmission to hospital, which would involve additional costs.

Complications

Complications can occur following any surgery. These include general complications of surgery as well as specific complications of the particular procedure.

General complications include infection, bleeding and bruising, and venous thrombosis (blood clots in the legs). Precautions are taken routinely to reduce the risk of these complications. Despite this, they will occasionally occur, and may require readmission to hospital.

Complications that are specific to the type of procedure that you are undergoing will have been discussed with you by your OSV surgeon. Should you have any questions, these should be raised prior to surgery. Please do not hesitate to contact us.

If it is after hours and you are concerned about a medical issue post surgery, please contact the hospital. For medical emergencies phone “000”.

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